2010-2011 University Catalog 
    
    May 16, 2022  
2010-2011 University Catalog archived

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MATH 101 - Calculus I


FDR: FM
Credits: 3
Planned Offering: Fall, Winter



An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem.

No individual topics for Winter 2011.

 

Topics for Fall 2010:

MATH 101A (3) — Calculus I. An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. This class is for students who have already taken Calculus and meets four days a week. (FM)

MATH 101B (3) — Calculus I: A First Course. Students who have already taken Calculus may not take this course. An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. This class is restricted to and specially tailored for those who are {\bf B}eginning their study of calculus. This class meets four days per week. (FM) Evans

MATH 101D (3) — Calculus I: Calculus Explorations. If you throw a ball up, which is greater, its ascent time or descent time? How long does it take to drain a tank? Can your bank compound interest continuously? Is there any chaos in calculus? How well does a tangent line really approximate a graph? What are the three pillars of calculus and how are they used? Through exploration of a variety of applications, this course will reinforce your calculus skills, while introducing you to some useful new ideas and techniques for problem solving. This class is for students who have already taken
Calculus and meets three days a week. (FM) Feldman

Math 101E (3) — Calculus & Environmental Issues. An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. In addition, this course will have an applied component centered on sustainability. Using data about natural resources (e.g., coal, water) and pollutants (e.g., carbon dioxide emissions), students will find mathematical models appropriate for the data, and then use the models and calculus to make predictions about pollution levels and the availability of resources given our current consumption. This class is for students who have already taken Calculus and meets three days a week. (FM) Finch

Math 101 H (3) — Calculus I: Calculus and Its Historical Development. This course is intended for students who wish to share in the spirit of investigation and invention that guided those who first discovered and used calculus. Its focus will be on problems that motivated the development of the tools of calculus, leading students to match wits with pioneers of the subject such as Pythagoras, Plato, Eudoxus, Aristotle, Archimedes, Fermat, Newton, and Leibniz. The course will also stress connections calculus has with the humanities as well as those with the sciences. This class is for students who have already taken Calculus and meets three days a week. (FM) McRae
Staff.





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