2010-2011 University Catalog 
    
    May 18, 2022  
2010-2011 University Catalog archived

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BIOL 111 - Fundamentals of Biology


FDR: SL: BIOL 113 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.
Credits: 3
Planned Offering: Fall, Winter



Corequisite: BIOL 113.An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

 

Topics for Winter 2011: 

BIOL 111A: Fundamentals of Biology: Primatology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course uses the Order Primates as the model for understanding basic principles of ecology, evolution, anatomy, and physiology. A review of the natural history of primates is included, as well as relevant information about primate conservation. A section of this course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher-level biology courses. (SL: BIOL 113 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Wallis. 

BIOL 111B: Fundamentals of Biology: Drug Design and Discovery (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Wonder why there are so many different therapeutic drugs on the market, and how they can possibly have such long lists of side effects? Think scientists will ever come up with “magic bullets” for treating any known ailment? In this course, we attempt to answer these questions by examining the scientific basis of rational drug design. Additionally, we explore the mechanisms by which curative drugs have been and continue to be discovered, with particular emphasis on medicines used to treat HIV, Influenza, and certain types of cancer. A section of this course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher-level biology courses. (SL: BIOL 113 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Sharma. 

BIOL 111C: Fundamentals of Biology: Foundations of Modern Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. A discussion of the history of biological thought from the Greeks to Darwin to the present genomic revolution. The course focuses on how scientists first addressed the fundamental phenomena in life: 1) reliable reproduction and genetic programming; 2) development from a single cell to a fully differentiated multicellular adult; and 3) the origin of species and the evolution of diversity. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher-level biology courses. (SL: BIOL 113 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Ayoub. 

BIOL 111D: Fundamentals of Biology: Rapid Communication in Animals (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course examines the structure and function of nerve cells with an emphasis on electrical excitability, synaptic transmission, and sensory transduction. In addition, we study the anatomy of the brain and examine the cellular mechanisms underlying simple behaviors and the pathology of degenerative CNS diseases. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher-level biology courses. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Watson.

Topics for Fall 2010:

BIOL 111A: Fundamentals of Biology: Adaptation and Biodiversity (3) Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? and (3) what is its future? Over the course of the semester we cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Hurd. ►10/UF BIOL 111A 01

BIOL 111B: Fundamentals of Biology: Communication from Cells to Organisms (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. A discussion of the issues of communication of a cell with its external environment beginning with the single-celled organism. We move on to a consideration of cell size and the evolution of multi-cellular organisms. Multi-cellular forms of communication are introduced and their role in maintaining a stable environment for the individual cells of the whole organism is studied. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). I’Anson.

BIOL 111C: Fundamentals of Biology: Human Physiology (3). Corequisite: Biology 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Homeostasis, as illustrated in body systems functioning, is the central theme of this section. Students explore the centrality of homeostasis in the human nervous, muscular, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. The case-study approach and discussion-based learning are utilized and emphasis is placed upon the development of analytical, written communication and oral communication skills. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113) Wielgus

BIOL 111D: Fundamentals of Biology: Human History (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Traditionally, the history of the human species has been the purview of archeologists and historians. More recently, genetic data have been used to explore and better understand many facets of human history. How are Neandertals related to modern humans? Where and when did modern humans evolve? What does genetics tell us about the peopling of the Americas? Did the first farming technologies spread through cultural diffusion or expansion of farming populations? This course examines the foundations and background of human population genetics in addition to research articles investigating the history of the human species.This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.  (SL: BIOL 113 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits) Cabe

BIOL 111E: Fundamentals of Biology: Heart Attacks and High Fructose Corn Syrup (3). Corequisite: Biology 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. We investigate the importance of nutrition in the context of the sweetening of our food supply by understanding the biochemical and physiological basis of atherosclerosis which in many patients, when left untreated, leads to a heart attack. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Hamilton.

BIOL 111F: Fundamentals of Biology: Foundations of Modern Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. A discussion of the history of biological thought from the Greeks to Darwin to the present genomic revolution. The course focuses on how scientists first addressed the fundamental phenomena in life: 1) reliable reproduction and genetic programming; 2) development from a single cell to a fully differentiated multicellular adult; and 3) the origin of species and the evolution of diversity. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Ayoub.





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