2013-2014 University Catalog 
    
    Apr 20, 2024  
2013-2014 University Catalog archived

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BIOL 111 - Fundamentals of Biology


FDR: SL: BIOL 113 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.
Credits: 3
Planned Offering: Fall, Winter



Prerequisites: For BIOL 111/113: Limited seating available for sophomores, juniors and seniors. Interested upper-division students should contact Helen I’Anson, Head of the Biology department, for consent as soon as the class schedule is available and before registration begins. Suitable for First-Years interested in pursuing a major in biology, neuroscience or environmental studies or the pre-health curriculum. For First-Years, priority will be given to those who have taken CHEM 110 during fall semester. Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: History of Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. A discussion of the history of biological thought from the Greeks to Darwin to the present genomic revolution. This section focuses on how scientists first addressed the fundamental phenomena in life: reliable reproduction and genetic programming, and the origin of species and the evolution of diversity. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Ayoub.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology:Conservation Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the intersection of biology and species conservation, including the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on species and ecosystems, the role of human impacts, and the tools used to make predictions about animal and plant populations. A large section of the course is devoted to participation in a national research project on the effects of roads and development on frog and toad populations. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Marsh.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology:Genetics of Human History (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Traditionally, the history of the human species has been the purview of archeologists and historians. More recently, genetic data have been used to explore and better understand many facets of human history. How are Neandertals and other ancient peoples related to modern humans? Where and when did modern humans evolve? What does genetics tell us about the peopling of the Americas? This section examines the foundations and background of human population genetics in addition to research articles investigating the history of the human species. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Cabe.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biology of Marine Organisms (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we examine specific examples of the unique biology of marine organisms and ecosystems, building upon fundamental concepts to explore advanced topics and research. Why are coral reefs dying? Why don’t sharks get cancer - or do they? We follow lines of scientific inquiry that have brought us to the current state of understanding on these and other specific examples. In the process, we progress through different levels of organization, generally starting with molecular / cellular biology and moving up through population and community ecology. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Humston.

Fall 2013 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Rapid Communication in Animals (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the structure and function of nerve cells with an emphasis on electrical excitability, synaptic transmission, and sensory transduction. As part of the background, we study the processes of replication, transcription, and translation. In addition, we study the anatomy of the brain and examine the cellular mechanisms underlying simple behaviors and the pathology of degenerative CNS diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Watson.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Genes Drugs and Toxins (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. The ways in which an organism responds to different drugs or toxins can be heavily influenced by its genetics. In this section, we explore the interplay between genetic variation and differences in the ways in which people respond to therapeutic drugs and environmental toxins. We consider a number of example case studies including the genetic basis for resistance to drugs used to treat cancer and individual variation in sensitivity to common pesticides. Our readings are primarily from the current scientific literature as we focus on the new and emerging fields of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. In the service of exploring these topics, we also cover: the flow of information from genes to proteins; complex cellular behaviors; molecular and population genetics; and many aspects of cellular physiology and regulation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Whitworth.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.





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