2012-2013 University Catalog 
    
    Dec 10, 2019  
2012-2013 University Catalog archived

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MATH 101 - Calculus I


FDR: FM
Credits: 3
Planned Offering: Fall, Winter



An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem.

Winter 2013 descriptions:

MATH 101-01,04: Calculus I: Calculus Explorations (3). If you throw a ball up, which is greater, its ascent time or descent time? How long does it take to drain a tank? Can your bank compound interest continuously? This class explores various applications of calculus while reviewing and reinforcing your basic calculus skills. The major topics are the tools that are most commonly used in mathematical modeling: probability and statistics, discrete dynamics, and differential equations. This section does not assume that students have already taken calculus, and meets four days a week. (FM) Feldman.

MATH 101-02,03: Calculus I (3). An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. This section does not assume that students have already taken calculus, and meets four days a week. (FM) Finch.

Fall 2012 descriptions:

MATH 101-01,02,03: Calculus I (3). An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. This section is for students who have already taken calculus and meets four days a week. (FM) Dymàcek.

MATH 101-04: Calculus I: Calculus Explorations (3). If you throw a ball up, which is greater, its ascent time or descent time? How long does it take to drain a tank? Can your bank compound interest continuously? This class explores various applications of calculus while reviewing and reinforcing your basic calculus skills. The major topics are the tools that are most commonly used in mathematical modeling: probability and statistics, discrete dynamics, and differential equations. This section is for students who have already taken calculus and meets three days a week. (FM) Feldman.

Math 101-05,06: Calculus I & Environmental Issues (3). An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. In addition, this section has an applied component centered on sustainability. Using data about natural resources (e.g., coal, water) and pollutants (e.g., carbon dioxide emissions), students find mathematical models appropriate for the data, and then use the models and calculus to make predictions about pollution levels and the availability of resources given our current consumption. This section is for students who have already taken calculus and meets three days a week. (FM) Finch.

MATH 101-07: Calculus I with Infinitesimals and Infinities (3). Is 0.999... really equal to 1? If average velocity is distance/time, how can instantaneous velocity, which would be 0/0, make any sense? In this section, we explore the foundations of calculus through modern treatments of infinitely small and infinitely large numbers as well as through the traditional approach of using limits. Our approach is philosophical in addition to being mathematical. Due to the fast pace of this course, students must have taken a previous course in the differential and integral calculus. (FM) McRae.

MATH 101B-01, 02: Calculus I: A First Course (3). Students who have already taken calculus may not take this section. An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. This class is restricted to and specially tailored for those who are beginning their study of calculus. This section meets four days per week. (FM) Bush.





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