2018-2019 University Catalog 
    
    Dec 18, 2018  
2018-2019 University Catalog
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GEOL 105 - Earth Lab


FDR: SL
Credits: 4


Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term. Preference given to first-years and sophomores. The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside field work with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. The primary goal of this course is an in-depth introduction to a particular region or field of geological study for introductory level science students. Information about the course is made available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements. Lab fee required.

Spring 2019, GEOL 105-01: FS: Earth Lab: Hawaii (4). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term. An introductory study of earth science and the geology of the Hawaiian Islands. Its purpose is to provide an unparalleled opportunity to observe a wide variety of geologic processes in action. This course entails close interaction with the faculty and intensive study amongst the students during the term. (SL) Knapp.

Spring 2019, GEOL 105-02: Earth Lab: The Next Big One (4). Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term. Preference given to first-years and sophomores. Some of humanity's biggest threats are a direct consequence of huge, powerful motions of water, air, and earth. In this course, we explore natural hazards through the lens of geology. What do we know about natural hazards? How do we know what we know? Do we know enough to keep people safe? We also think critically about natural hazards communication. How is information about natural hazards communicated to the public? Is the information accurate? Should we, as geologists, address misconceptions, and, if so, how? We focus on case studies of atmospheric, hydrologic, and tectonic natural hazards, and spend 5 days at Mount Saint Helens, observing the geologic and societal aftermath of the destructive 1980 eruption. (SL) Jay Seymour.

 




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