2018-2019 University Catalog 
    
    Nov 12, 2019  
2018-2019 University Catalog archived

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ECON 295 - Special Topics in Economics


Credits: 3


Prerequisites: Normally ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102 but may vary with topic. Preference to ECON majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years. Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Spring 2019, ECON 295-01: Introduction to Sustainable Development (3). Prerequisites: ECON 100 or 101. Preference to first-years and sophomores. In September 2015, many countries adopted a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for 2015-2030 to replace the Millennium Development Goals when they expired in 2015. These SDGs set targets for the three pillars of sustainable development -- reducing poverty, protecting the environment, and increasing equality of opportunity for those who may have had less-than-equal opportunity in the past. This course provides an introduction to the concept, theories, and potential outcomes of sustainable development. Additionally, we take a case-study approach and look at policies and programs that have aimed to address each of the SDGs. Students are introduced to sustainability through policies addressing oceans, biodiversity, climate, energy, education, social investment, and health. Casey.

Winter 2019, ECON 295A-01: The Economy of Brazil (3). Prerequisite: ECON 100 or 101. This course examines economic development in Brazil, with the purpose of identifying the factors that have prevented Brazil from developing the type of economy and standard of living level associated with a North American or European country. Recommendations are made for future policy directions, and implications for other emerging economy countries are examined. The class has three distinct phases. In the first phase, we have four hours of lectures per week. Following this, there is a weekend workshop with distinguished speakers. After the workshop, the research phase of the class begins, with students responsible for contributing to a white paper on the topic of the course. During the research phase, there will be weekly class meeting to discuss progress. Kahn.

Winter 2019, ECON 295B-01: The Economics of Poverty and Food Insecurity (3). Prerequisite: ECON 100. Household food insecurity has many determinants including socio-economic status, time, the food environment, education, and culture. This course explores the economic determinants of food insecurity and why it persists today. We use readings from economics, sociology, psychology and nutrition to understand various perspectives of food insecurity and, as necessary, cover micro-economic theory and econometric concepts to understand the literature. Periodically, we work in the computer lab using publicly available datasets and Stata to gain tangible coding and data-management skills. Students learn to appreciate economics as a larger discipline, which will assist you in viewing and understanding the world around you. (EXP) Scharadin.

Winter 2019, ECON 295B-02: The Economics of Poverty and Food Insecurity (3). Prerequisite: ECON 100. Household food insecurity has many determinants including socio-economic status, time, the food environment, education, and culture. This course explores the economic determinants of food insecurity and why it persists today. We use readings from economics, sociology, psychology and nutrition to understand various perspectives of food insecurity and, as necessary, cover micro-economic theory and econometric concepts to understand the literature. Periodically, we work in the computer lab using publicly available datasets and Stata to gain tangible coding and data-management skills. Students learn to appreciate economics as a larger discipline, which will assist you in viewing and understanding the world around you. (EXP) Scharadin.

Spring 2019, ECON 295-02: Land in O'odham Culture Economics and History (4). A seminar on the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the O'odham Indians' ties to their lands as expressed in their pre- and post-reservation lifeways. Students address three major themes: 1) O'odham land and cosmology; 2) land and economy in O'odham history; and 3) contemporary cultural and economic issues among O'odham peoples. The class spends 8 days in the Sonoran Desert region of Southern Arizona to visit sites and meet with speakers in and around the Tohono O'odham Nation. (SS4) Guse and Markowitz.

Fall 2018, ECON 295A-01: The Economics of Race (3). Prerequisite: Normally ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102. Preference to ECON majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years. A critical examination of the causes and consequences of racial disparities in valued life-course outcomes in America. More than 50 years have passed since the passage of civil-rights and equal-employment-opportunity legislation in the U.S. Nevertheless, racial gaps persist - with blacks lagging whites - on most socioeconomic indicators. The course is divided into four parts: (1) an introduction to the biological and social construction of race; (2) theories to explain racial disparities; (3) an examination of racial disparity in such realms as education, health, wealth, wages, and unemployment; and (4) policies to address racial disparities. In each section of the course, students explore relevant issues through assigned readings, films, and classroom discussion. The course fosters the development and use of critical thinking, effective writing, and oral presentation skills. Student evaluation is based on classroom participation, an examination of concepts discussed, film commentaries, and a term paper. Goldsmith.




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