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Washington and Lee University    
 
    
 
  Oct 23, 2017
 
2017-2018 University Catalog

Changes Approved since January 2016 - Official Notification


(last updated October 17, 2017)

New or revised courses
Deleted courses
Revisions to degree, major, and minor requirements
Policy changes
Miscellaneous information

New or Revised Courses

ARTH 378 - Border Art: Contemporary Chicanx and U.S. Latinx Art  
ARTS 222 - Paris: History, Image, Myth, Part I  
ARTS 223 - Paris: History, Image, Myth, Part II  
BUS 360 - Framing a Franchise: The Business of Entertainment 
CLAS 225 - Ancient Greek History   
CSCI 325 - Distributed Systems  - 4 credits to 3 credits
CSCI 251 - Android Application Development  
DH 212 - Text Mining for History  
ECON 100 - Introduction to Economics  
ECON 222 - Current Public Policy Debates  
ECON 241 - Economics of War and Peace 
ECON 251 - Women in the Economy  
ECON 320 - Mathematical Economics   - renumbered from ECON 220
ECON 335 - Topics in Econometrics  
ECON 239 - Exploring Childhood in Denmark: Comparing Policies and Practices to the U.S.  
ECON 376 - Health: A Social Science Exploration  
EDUC 239 - Exploring Childhood in Denmark: Comparing Policies and Practices to the U.S.  
ENGL 233 - Introduction to Film  - crosslisted with FILM 233
ENGL 374 - King and Kubrick  
FILM 121 - Script Analysis for Stage and Screen  (THTR 121) - change in FDR to HL
FILM 233 - Introduction to Film  - crosslisted with ENGL 233
FILM 251 - Ethnographic Study of Modem Day Slavery in Ghana: Creating Short Documentary Film FILM 251 - Ethnographic Study of Modem Day Slavery in Ghana: Creating Short Documentary Film  
FREN 451 - Internship Abroad  
FREN 452 - Internship Abroad  
FREN 453 - Internship Abroad  
HIST 207 - Paris: History, Image, Myth, Part I  
HIST 210 - Paris: History, Image, Myth, Part II  
HIST 212 - Text Mining for History 
HIST 216 - The Making of Modern Scotland  
HIST 227 - Discover Scotland: History and Culture through Theatre  
HIST 236 - Afro-Latin America  
MESA 195 - Gateway to Middle East and South Asia Studies  
MESA 393 - Capstone in Middle East and South Asia Studies  
PE 177 - Body Conditioning  - title change from Dance Conditioning
PE 179 - Interpretive Movement and Fitness  - title change from Modern Dance
POL 285 - Contemporary Britain  
POV 450 - Shepherd Summer Internship  - graded S/U
POV 453 - Shepherd Summer Internship  - graded S/U
PSYC 298 - Topical Seminar in Psychology  
PSYC 398 - Advanced Research Methods in Psychology  
REL 104 - Secularity, Disenchantment, and Religion  - renumbered from REL 203
REL 130 - Us, Them, and God: Religion, Identity, and Interaction in the Middle East and South Asia  
SOAN 261 - Campus Sex in the Digital Age  - to 4-credit spring course
SOAN 278 - Health and Inequality: An Introduction to Medical Sociology 
THTR 121 - Script Analysis for Stage and Screen  (FILM 121) - change in FDR to HL
THTR 209 - Stage Management  - change to 3 credits and FDR to HA
THTR 210 - Ancient and Global Theater  
THTR 211 - Western Theater History  - change in FDR to HL
THTR 227 - Discover Scotland: History and Culture through Theatre  

Deleted Courses 

For 2017-18 catalog

ARTH 341: City as a Work of Art: Paris
BUS 311: Healthcare Information Systems
BUS 312: Computer Forensics
BUS 333: International Production and Operations Management
BUS 385: iStartUp
CLAS 421: Directed Individual Research
CLAS 422: Directed Individual Research
CSCI 295: Language Lab
EAS 402: Directed Individual Study
EAS 406: Directed Individual Study
ECON 195: Topics in Economics
ECON 220: Mathematical Economics - renumbered to ECON 320
ECON 221: Experimental Economics
ECON 225: Industrial Revolutions
ECON 226: Socio-Econ Themes in Lit & Film
ECON 231: Economics of Race & Ethnicity
ECON 232: Obstacles: African-American Equal Opportunity
ECON 233: Colorism
ECON 248: Economic Analysis of Law
ECON 303: Topics in Economics - renumbered to ECON 335
ECON 304: Health: A Social Science Exploration - renumbered to ECON 376
ECON 318: Monetary Plicy in 1970
ECON 340: Innovation and Patents
ECON 406: Directed Individual Study
ENGN 251: Experimental Methods in Physics and Engineering
FREN 172: Supervised Study Abroad: Intermediate French
FREN 213: Atelier de conversation
FREN 274: Cinema francais et francophone
FREN 333: La Stylistique
GERM 395: Seminar
GR 421: Directed Individual Research
GR 422: Directed Individual Research
HIST 173: Global History to 1300
HIST 248: Populism, Progressivism and the New Deal
HIST 253: Gay and Lesbian Life in the 20th Century
HIST 267: Mapping
HIST 270: Modern Islamic Political Thought
HIST 271: Profit and Prophesy in Islamic History
HIST 283: East Africa: A Thousand Years
HIST 280: Japan to 1800: Samans-Samurai
HIST 287: Supervised Study Abroad: Athens
INTR 210: Preparation for Spring Term Abroad in Paris
INTR 296: Spring Studies in Culture and Society
ITAL 202: Supervised Study Abroad
JOUR 216: Press & Civil Rights Movement
JOUR 225: Crisis Communications
JOUR 232: Research Methods in Mass Communication
JOUR 234: A Sense of Place: Multimedia News Feature
JOUR 241: Media & Poverty
JOUR 296: Topics in News Media History
JOUR 319: Mass Media & Society
JOUR 357: Magazine Feature Writing
LATN 302: Advanced Republican and Augustan Verse
LATN 423: Directed Individual Research
LIT 261: Modern German Lit in Translation
PE 175: Canoeing
PE 313: Water Safety Instructor's Course
PHIL 399: Seminar on a Living Philospher
PHYS 251: Experimental Methods in Physics and Engineering
POL 279: Comparative Political Analysis
POL 280: Biopolicy: Frontiers of Science
POL 327: SEM: Japanese Political System
POL 350: SEM: Ralph Ellison & AMerican Dream
POL 402: Directed Individual Study
POL 406: Directed Individual Study
POL 459: Internship
REL 203:  Secularity, Disenchantment, and Religion - renumbered to REL 104
SOAN 360 replaced by 370 or 371 - for 2017-18 catalog
SOAN 375: Methods of Social Inquiry - in 2017-18 catalog
SPAN 172: Supervixsed Study Abroad: Intermediate Spanish
SPAN 192: Practical Applications of the Spanish Language
SPAN 292: Tutorial in Foreign Lanague Teaching, Translation, and Interpretation
SPAN 352: Voces caribenas
 

Revisions to degree, major, and minor requirements 

Africana Studies (2017-2018 catalog)
approved revising the requirements for a minor in Africana Studies as follows:
"2. Africa-focused course. One course chosen from among HIST 273, 276, 277, 378,..." "... and when appropriate, ... HIST 180, 269..."
3. African Diaspora-focused course: One course chosen from among... ECON 232; ENGL 366; HIST 236, 259, 260: MUS 221; POL 250, 350, 360;..." "... and when appropriate HIST 180, 269."
4. Three additional courses from categories 2 and 3 above and the following courses: ECON 233, ENGL 350..."

Archaeology (2017-2018 catalog)

Approved adding a minor in archaeology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, effective for students
enrolled during Fall 2017 or later.

"A minor in archaeology requires completion of six courses as follows. In meeting the requirements of this
interdisciplinary minor, a student must complete at least nine credits not also used to meet the requirements of any
other major or minor.

1. History/Theory: Either SOAN 206 or ARTH/CLAS 200
2. Methods: One course chosen from SOAN 210, 211, or, when appropriate and approved in advance, CLAS 295 or a field methods course
3. Distribution: Three courses selected from at least two of the following three areas. Additional courses may be
used when the topic is relevant and approved in advance.

a. Natural and Physical Sciences: BIOL 101, 105, 140, 160, 185; CHEM 100, 156, 160; ENGN 178, 260; ENV 250; GEOL 100, 101, 105, 205, 247, 260, 275, 330; PHYS 260
b. Social Sciences: ECON 186, 255; HIST 230, 238; JOUR 266, 33; SOAN 206, 207, 210, 211, 230, 238, 240, 266, 286, or, when appropriate, SOAN 180.
c. Humanities: ARTH 170, 200, 245, 246, 288, 343, 347; CLAS 200, 223, 287, 288, 326, 338; HIST 130, 131, 244, 245, 262, 287; REL 223, 286, or when appropriate, CLAS 295

4. A capstone project that culminates in a major research project on a topic proposed by the student that focuses on archaeology. It will take the form of an independent study (3 credits) with a person in the core faculty or approved by the SOAN department chair or archaeology curriculum coordinator. It could also be a senior thesis or honors thesis with similar approval."

Biology (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved the following revisions to majors and minors in biology, effective with the 2017-18 catalog.

major in biology leading to a BA degree

"3. Molecules and Cells: One course from BIOL 211*, 211S, 212S, 215*, 215S*, 220, 223, 280*, 285* and, when appropriate, BIOL 297
4. Ecology and Evolution: One course from BIOL 210, 216*, 217*, 231*, 240*, 241*, 242*, 243*, 244S, 245*, 270S*, ENV 212 and, when appropriate, BIOL 297"

major in biology leading to a BS degree

"3. Molecules and Cells: One additional course from BIOL 211, 211S, 212S, 215, 215S, 223, 280, 285, CHEM
341/343 and, when appropriate, BIOL 297...
5. Ecology and Evolution: One course from BIOL 210, 216, 217, 231, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244S, 245, 246, ENV 212 and, when appropriate, BIOL 297"

minor in animal biology

"2. Zoology or Invertebrate Zoology: BIOL 240 or 244S"

minor in molecular/cell biology

"3. Cell biology: BIOL 211 or 211S
4. Intermediate level: two courses chosen from BIOL 212S, 223, 280, 285 and, when appropriate, 297"

minor in quantitative biology

"2. Genetics or cell biology: BIOL 211, 211S, or 220...
4. Intermediate level: two courses chosen from BIOL 212S, 267, 282, 283, 285 and, when appropriate, 297"

Business Administration (2016-2017, 2017-2018 catalogs)
Approved revising the business administration major to add the following courses to the non-business electives requirement.
ARTS 320 - Large Format Photography
ENGL 206 - Topics in Creative Writing: Nonfiction
ENGL 305 - Writing Outside the Lines
JOUR 215 - The Magazine; Past, Present, and Future
JOUR 325 - Crisis Communications
POL 295 - American Government: Business, Government, and the International Economy
POV 423 - Poverty and Human Capability: A Research Seminar
SOAN 265 - Exploring Social Networks

Revising the major in business administration, effective with the 2017-18 catalog, as follows.
"A major in Business Administration leading to a Bachelor of Science with Special Attainments in Commerce
requires at least 46 credits total, including at least 24 credits in Business Administration and 22 credits not in Business
Administration as follows:
1. ACCT 201, 201; BUS 211, 212, 221; ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102; INTR 201, 201"

Chemistry (2017-2018 catalog)
approved revising the major in chemistry leading to a BAchelor of Science degree as follows:
"1. CHEM 110, 211, 241 or 241S, 242, 243, 250, 260, 261, 262, 266, 341; MATH 101, 102, 221; PHYS 111,112,113,114
2. Two courses chosen from..."

Chemistry-Engineering (2017-2018 catalog)

approved deleting the major beginning with the 2017-2018 catalog)
earlier action
[revise the major as follows:
1.    ... CHEM 110, 211, 241 or 241S, 242, 260; ...
2. Eight additional credits chosen from ENGN 160, 178, or courses numbered 200 or above..."]

Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved renaming and revising the minor in museum studies as follows, effective with the 2017-18 catalog.
"A minor in cultural heritage and museum studies requires at least 21 credits from seven courses. In meeting the requirements of this minor, a student may not use more than nine credits (three courses) that are used to meet the requirements of any other major or minor.
   1. Core required courses: ARTH 398, 453
   2. Introductory level course: one course chosen from ARTH 101, 102, 140, 141, 170 and, when appropriate, ARTH 195
   3 Intermediate-level course: one course chosen from HIST 230 or 200-level ARTH courses
   4. Looting, Trading, and Marketing: one course chosen from ARTH 125, 245, 257, [ARTH 2-- Looting, Destroying, and Curating Cultural Heritage Objects]
   5. Unearthing, Conserving, and Curating: two courses chosen from ARTH 243, 276, 288, 347, 356; CHEM 156; CLAS 200, 338; SOAN 186, 210, 211, 224, 232, 286, 332, 378"

Dance (2017-2018 catalog)

revise the minor in dance
A minor in dance requires completion of at least 8 courses in dance as follows. In meeting the requirements of this discipline-based minor, a student may not use more than nine credits that are also used to meet the requirements of another major or minor.
1. DANC 110, 111
2. One course chosen from DANC 220, 240
3. Four courses chosen from DANC 120, 202, 215, 225, 230, 233, 250, 292, 390
4. One course chosen from DANC 220, 240, 330, 340, 390, 403; THTR 131, 209, 251, 253, 336, 338


revise the minor in dance (2018-2019 catalog)
"1. Three credits from DANC 110
2. DANC 111
3. One course chosen from DANC 220, 240
4. ..."

Economics (2017-2017 catalog)

A major in economics leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 43 credits as follows:

  1. Either ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102
  2. ECON 203, 210, 211; INTR 201, 202
  3. One economics course numbered at or above 330
  4. One additional economics course numbered above 300
  5. Four additional courses in economics numbered above 211
  6. Achievement in calculus at a level equivalent to MATH 101
  7. Two additional courses in politics or computer science, or in mathematics for which MATH 101 is a prerequisite
  8. Grade-point average: at least 2.000 in the economics credits offered for the major, and at least 2.000 in the total of all credits, from whatever department, offered for the major.

Students pursuing Honors in Economics are required to take ECON 399.

Education (2017-2018 catalog)

approved revisions to the minor in Education:

2.   Electives: Two courses totaling at least six credits chosen from among the following: EDUC 239 (ECON 239), 305, 330, 335, 336, 340, 343, 345, 353, 356, 365, 369 (unless ECON 234 has been taken), 375, 377; and, when appropriate, EDUC 403
 3.   Fieldwork: At least two credits chosen from the following: EDUC 210, 303, 306, 331, 337, 341, 344, 346, 354, 357, 366, 376, 378; and, when appropriate, EDUC 401 or POV 102

approved revisions to the minor in Education Policy:

2. Quantitative Literacy: One course chosen from INTR 202, MATH 118, PSYC 120
3. Education Policy Analysis: One course chosen from ECON 234, ECON 236, ECON 239 (EDUC 239)
4. Additional Policy Analysis and Formation: One course chosen from POL 203, POL 232, ECON 222, ECON 250"
5. Educational Context: One additional course chosen from the following: ECON 231, 232, 235, 237, 238, 239 (EDUC 239), 250
6. Fieldwork: At least two courses comprising at least three credits chosen from the following:
... EDUC 201, 210, 303, 306, 331, 337, 341, 344, 346, 354, 357, 366, 369...

Engineering (2017-2018 catalog)

revised the major
    "4.     One four-credit laboratory course not used above chosen from

  • CHEM 110, or CSCI 121, or

  • 200 level or above from a list of approved courses in BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, ENGN, GEOL, PHYS"

English (2017-2018 catalog)

revise the major in English

"...4. Literatures between 1700-1900: at least one course chosen from ENGL 334, ...349, 358, 362, 367, 393

Environmental Studies (2017-2018)
Revise the major in environmental studies as follows:
6. Electives: D. Social Sciences: take one course chosen from ACCT 303, ECON 255, ECON 259, or POL 233

Revise the minor in environmental studies as follows:

"2. Social Sciences: one course chosen from each of the following two groups:
    Group 1: ECON 101, POL 100,105
    Group 2: ACCT 303, ECON 255, 259, ENV 295, POL 233

Film and Visual Culture (2018-2019 catalog)
revision to the minor in film and visual culture
"2. Capstone course: FILM 413 or other departmental directed study (e.g., 403) approved in advance by the
department head of Theater, Dance, and Film Studies"

 

Integrated Engineering (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved a new major in integrated engineering (IE) leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 65 credits including the following. This major may not be combined with the major in engineering nor with a major in the respective department associated with the science track that a student selects for the IE major.
   1. PHYS 111, 112, 113, 114, MATH 101, 102, 221, 332, ENGN 178, 203, 204, 207 (PHYS 207), 225 (PHYS 225), 378,379
   2. One lecture/lab sequence from ENGN 301+351 or 311+361
   3. One course from: ENGN 208,240,260,267,295, 301+351, 311+361, 312,330,395
   4. Four courses in a single science subject in one of the following tracks:
       • BIOL 111 + 113 and three BIOL courses 200 level or above
       • CHEM 1 IO, 241, 242, and 261
       • CSCI 111, 112, and two CSCI courses 200 level or above
       • GEOL 100 or 101, and three GEOL courses 200 level or above

Journalism (2017-2018 catalog)

A major in journalism leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 53 credits, including at least 35 credits in journalism and mass communications and at least 72 credits outside the department.

  1. Courses required for the major: JOUR 101, 190, 201, 202, 258, 301, 344, 356, POL 203,and at least two credits of internship (JOUR 451-452)
  2. Diversity of Experience: Take one course chosen from the following: ECON 231, 232, 233; ENGL 262, 359, 361, 366; HIST 253, 260, 268; JOUR 266, 268; PHIL 235, 238, 242, 243, 244, 254; POV 101; SOAN 228, 268, 275, 280, or when appropriate, PSYC 296;
  3. Completion of one of the following sequences:

a. Journalism

i. One course chosen from JOUR 280, 371, 372, 395
ii. Either JOUR 220 or 341
iii. Either JOUR 351 or 362
iv. Completion of a minor other than mass communications or of four additional courses of at least three
credits at the 200 level or above in another discipline.

b. Business Journalism

i. Additional required courses: ACCT 201, JOUR 371, 372
ii. Take ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102 (by the end of the sophomore year)
iii. Either JOUR 351 or 362
iv. One additional course in economics at the 200 level or above
v. Three additional courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in accounting, business administration, or economics, including one course with an international focus selected from among the following: ACCT 371, 372; BUS 305, 330, 333, 335, 337, 357, 372, 390; ECON 233, 259, 270, 271, 280, 282, 288, 319, 356, and, when appropriate, ECON 295, ECON 395, or other courses with approval of the department head

Latin American and Caribbean Studies (2017-2018 catalog)

changes to the minor:
"Art and Humanities: ARTH 170, 271, 273, 274, 276, 375, 376, 378; ...
Related: 6 credits from the following or from any course not used above in 2. Distribution: BIOL 216; BUS 337; ECON 259; LACS 195, 257, 421, 422, 423; POL 279; SPAN 192, 201, 216, 270, 290, 292, 392; and  if approved, BUS 305, 335, 390; DANC 215; ECON 288; INTR 296; SOAN 286, SPAN 295"

Mass Communications minor (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved changes to the minor:

A minor in mass communications requires at least six regular three- or four-credit JOUR courses. Minors will also be asked to write a short paper and attend a group assessment conversation during winter term of their senior year. This is not a minor in journalism. It offers liberal-arts breadth in mass media as a discipline and thorough exposure to the practice or craft but not professional preparation for a career. A student may not complete both a major and a minor in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communications. In meeting the requirements of this discipline-based minor, a student may not use more than nine credits that are also used to meet the requirements of another major or minor.

1. JOUR 101
2. Professional Values: One course chosen from JOUR 240, 242, 301, 344, and 345
3. Media Theory/History: One course chosen from JOUR 221, 231, 296, 318, 319, 325, 332, and 338
4. Media Practice: One course chosen from JOUR 201, 220, 227, 273, 280, 341, 351, 357, 365, 371, 372, and 395
5. Two additional courses in journalism and mass communications
6. Short paper and group assessment

Medieval and Renaissance Studies major and minor (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved revising the major requirements in Medieval and Renaissance studies, as follows,

"A major in Medieval and Renaissance studies leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 33 credits as follows:
   1. MRST 110, 110A, or one of the following courses: ARTH 101, 102; CLAS 201, 205, 208, 210, 224; ENGL 240,
242, 250, 252; FILM 255; GERM 318; HIST 100, 101, 170; LIT 203, 218, 219; MUS 201; REL 101, 102, 105, 106,
108, 131, 132; SPAN 210; THTR 210; or, when appropriate, ARTH 180; CLAS 180; ENGL 299; FILM 195, 196;
FREN 281, 283, 285; HIST 180, 195; LIT 180, 295; REL 180; SPAN 211, 220; THTR 121, 180; WRIT 100
   2. 27 additional credits chosen from courses in the following four areas. Majors must complete four courses in one
area, two courses in each of two other areas, and one course in the fourth area.
   History and History of Science: CLAS 224; HIST 100, 101, 170, 201, 202, 203, 204, 217, 219, 305, 306, 307;
PHYS 150; SPAN 333, or, when appropriate, HIST 180, 195, 229, 395, 403; MRST 395, 403; PHYS 403; ROML
295
   Literature: CLAS 180, 201, 203, 205, 208, 215; ENGL 240, 242, 250, 252, 311, 312, 313, 316, 319, 320, 326,
330, FREN 281; GERM 318; LATN 327; LIT 203, 218, 219; SPAN 210, 211, 220, 312, 320, 322, 323, 333; or,
when appropriate, ENGL 299, 392, 394, 403; FREN 341, 403; ITAL 403; LIT 180, 295; MRST 395, 403; ROML
295; SPAN 397, 403
   History of Ideas: ARTH 385; CLAS 200, 204, 210, 221; FREN 341; HIST 200, 306, 307; PHIL 110, 221, 222; REL
101, 102, 105, 106, 108, 131, 132, 215, 216, 219, 225, 250, 260, 283, 284, 350; or, when appropriate, FREN 283,
285; PHIL 180, 195; 395, 403; MRST 395, 403; POL 396, 403; REL 180, 403; ROML 295
   Fine Arts: FILM 255; ARTH 101, 102, 253, 254, 255, 256, 350, 354, 355, 384, MUS 201; THTR 210, 341, or,
when appropriate, FILM 195, 196; ARTH 180, 394, 403; MUS 423; MRST 395, 403; ROML 295; THTR 121, 180
   3. MRST 403, 473 or 493 (3-3). A directed study or thesis in another discipline may be used to meet this requirement
if approved in advance by the MRST Advisory Committee through its chair."

Approved a new minor (2017-2018 catalog)

"A minor In Medieval and Renaissance studies requires completion of 18 credits from six courses. In meeting the
requirements of this interdisciplinary minor, a student must use at least nine credits not also used to meet the
requirements of any other major(s) or minor. Four courses must be taken at the 200 level or above.
   1. MRST 110, 110A, or one of the following courses: ARTH 101, 102; CLAS 201, 205, 208, 210, 224; ENGL 240,
242, 250, 252; FILM 255; GERM 318; HIST 100, 101, 170; LIT 203, 218, 219; MUS 201; REL 101, 102, 105, 106,
108, 131, 132; SPAN 210; THTR 210; or, when appropriate, ARTH 180; CLAS 180; ENGL 299; FILM 195, 196;
FREN 281, 283, 285; HIST 180, 195; LIT 180, 295; REL 180; SPAN 211, 220; THTR 121, 180; WRIT 100
   2. Four additional courses chosen from the following, with at least one course chosen from three of the following four
categories.
   History and History of Science: CLAS 224; HIST 100, 101, 170, 201, 202, 203, 204, 217, 219, 305, 306, 307;
PHYS 150; SPAN 333, or, when appropriate, HIST 180, 195, 229, 395, 403; MRST 395, 403; PHYS 403; ROML
295
   Literature: CLAS 180, 201, 203, 205, 208, 215; ENGL 240, 242, 250, 252, 311, 312, 313, 316, 319, 320, 326,
330, FREN 281; GERM 318; LATN 327; LIT 203, 218, 219; SPAN 210, 211, 220, 312, 320, 322, 323, 333; or,
when appropriate, ENGL 299, 392, 394, 403; FREN 341, 403; ITAL 403; LIT 180, 295; MRST 395, 403; ROML
295; SPAN 397, 403
   History of Ideas: ARTH 385; CLAS 200, 204, 210, 221; FREN 341; HIST 200, 306, 307; PHIL 110, 221, 222; REL
101, 102, 105, 106, 108, 131, 132, 215, 216, 219, 225, 250, 260, 283, 284, 350; or, when appropriate, FREN 283,
285; PHIL 180, 195; 395, 403; MRST 395, 403; POL 396, 403; REL 180, 403; ROML 295
   Fine Arts: FILM 255; ARTH 101, 102, 253, 254, 255, 256, 350, 354, 355, 384, MUS 201; THTR 210, 341, or,
when appropriate, FILM 195, 196; ARTH 180, 394, 403; MUS 423; MRST 395, 403; ROML 295; THTR 121, 180
   4. Capstone course: MRST 403 approved in advance. A directed study or thesis in another discipline may be used
to meet this requirement if approved in advance by the MRST Advisory Committee through its chair."

Middle East and South Asia studies (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved adding the following two minors in Middle East and South Asia studies, effective with the Class of 2018, though it will first appear in the 2018-19 catalog.

A minor in Middle East and South Asia studies without language (MESAN) requires the completion of seven courses (at least 21 credits). In meeting the requirements of this interdisciplinary minor, a student must use at least nine credits not also used to meet the requirements of any other major or minor. No more than two language courses can count toward this minor. Students should regularly consult with the Program Director about course substitutions due to changes in departmental offerings, and courses taken abroad.

1. Gateway course: One course introducing the MESA area through comparative, broad-scale consideration of cultural processes, chosen from among the following: HIST 170, 171; MESA 195; REL 130, 283
2. Distribution: 3 additional courses (9-11 credits) selected from the following, with at least one course from at least two of the following three areas. Additional courses may be used when the topic is relevant and the program director approves in advance:

a. Art History and Literature: ARTH 140, 141, 242, 243, 245, 246, 342, 343; LIT 273; REL 273, or, when appropriate, LIT 295 (on a MESA-related topic)
b. Other Humanities (no more than two of which can be ARAB or SKT): ARAB 111, 112, 161, 162, 211, 212; HIST 170, 171; REL 101, 102, 106, 130, 131, 132, 231, 250, 283, 335, 350, 381; SKT 101, 102, 201, 202, 301; or, when appropriate, REL 260 (on a MESA-related topic)
c. Social Sciences: ECON 246, POL 384, REL 222, 246; or, when appropriate, ECON 276, 295, 395; POL 274, 396

3. Further Courses: Two additional 3- or 4-credit courses from MESA course offerings.
4. Capstone Experience: MESA 393, taken after the completion of all other requirements, culminates in a major research paper on a topic proposed by the student and approved by the Program Director and supervising faculty adviser.

A minor in Middle East and South Asia studies with language emphasis (MESAL) requires the completion of seven courses (at least 21 credits). In meeting the requirements of this interdisciplinary minor, a student must use at least nine credits not also used to meet the requirements of any other major or minor. Students should regularly consult with the Program Director about course substitutions due to changes in departmental offerings, and courses taken abroad.

1. Gateway course: One course introducing the MESA area through comparative, broad-scale consideration of cultural processes, chosen from among the following: HIST 170, 171; MESA 195; REL 130, 283
2. Distribution: Three additional courses (at least nine credits) selected from the following, with at least one course from at least two of the following three areas. Additional courses may be used when the topic is relevant and the program director approves in advance:

a. Art History and Literature: ARTH 140, 141, 242, 243, 245, 246, 342, 343; LIT 273; REL 273, or, when appropriate, LIT 295 (on a MESA-related topic)
b. Other Humanities: REL 101, 102, 106, 131, 132, 231, 250, 260 (on a MESA-related topic), 335, 350, 381; or, when appropriate, REL 260 (on a MESA-related topic)
a. Social Sciences: ECON 246, POL 384, REL 222, 246; or, when appropriate, ECON 276, 295, 395; POL 274, 396

3. Language: Three additional 3- or 4-credit courses earned by completing through term five in one MESA-relevant language. The first two terms of language study are not applicable to the minor:

a. Arabic: successful completion of ARAB 211 or its equivalent.
b. Sanskrit: successful completion of SKT 301 or its equivalent.
c. Other MESA-relevant languages (e.g., Hebrew, Hindi, Persian, Tibetan, Turkish, Urdu, or potentially other languages) can be studied elsewhere (e.g., intensive language programs at other universities; language study abroad) and will be considered by the Program Director for credit towards the MESA with Language option.

The language component will conclude, as part of ARAB 211 or SKT 301, with a fifth-term project, in which each student will read sources in Arabic or Sanskrit, as well as relevant secondary literature, and write a paper which will include discussion of how the topic relates to the larger concerns of MESA studies. Those writing a fifth-term project paper will participate in the regular capstone workshops with capstone paper writers, and will give an oral presentation on their work.

Museum Studies (2017-2018 catalog)

Approved renaming and revising the minor in museum studies as follows, effective with the 2017-18 catalog.
"A minor in cultural heritage and museum studies requires at least 21 credits from seven courses. In meeting the requirements of this minor, a student may not use more than nine credits (three courses) that are used to meet the requirements of any other major or minor.
   1. Core required courses: ARTH 398, 453
   2. Introductory level course: one course chosen from ARTH 101, 102, 140, 141, 170 and, when appropriate, ARTH 195
   3 Intermediate-level course: one course chosen from HIST 230 or 200-level ARTH courses
   4. Looting, Trading, and Marketing: one course chosen from ARTH 125, 245, 257, [ARTH 2-- Looting, Destroying, and Curating Cultural Heritage Objects]
   5. Unearthing, Conserving, and Curating: two courses chosen from ARTH 243, 276, 288, 347, 356; CHEM 156; CLAS 200, 338; SOAN 186, 210, 211, 224, 232, 286, 332, 378"

Music (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved adding the following major in music leading to a Bachelor of Science degree, effective with the 2017-18 catalog.
A major in music leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires at least 53 credits as follows:
   1. MUS 121, 161, 162, 163, 164, 195, 201, 202, 261, 262, 325, 365, 473 or 493 (thesis)
   2. Completion of one of the following emphases:
   a. Vocal Music Emphasis:
       • MUS 116, 210, 326;
       • 7 credits of applied study in voice; and
       • 8 credits of major choral ensemble (MUS 109, 110)
   b. Instrumental Music Emphasis:
       • MUS 327, 350, 351, 352, 353;
       • 7 credits of applied study on primary instrument (in addition to any applied piano courses that may be required in order to complete the piano proficiency requirement); and
       • 8 credits of major instrumental ensemble (MUS 113, 114, 115)
   3. Enrollment in ensemble courses (108-116) is required every fall and winter term after declaring the music major
   4. Demonstrated piano proficiency by the end of the sophomore year
   5. Successful completion of MUS 200 every fall and winter term after declaring the music major.

Approved revisions to the Music major leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree as follows:
Performance: three credits chosen from applied music courses at the 300-level or above; and six credits chosen from MUS 210, 220, 221, 231, 232, 295, 296, 325, 326, 327, 361, 362, and 423

Neuroscience (2017-2018 catalog)

revised the major:

"1.   Core (5 courses): BIOL 111 /113; BIOL 211, 211 S, or 220; CHEM 110; NEUR 120; and PSYC 110 or 111"

"3.   Specialization: ...
     e. PSYC 216, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 259"

Philosophy (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved changes to the major in philosophy:

2. Senior Capstone: at least one 300-level course in senior year or PHIL 473 or PHIL 493 (3-3)

Majors who are not pursuing Honors must take at least one 300-level course in theri senior year. This 300-level course must be in addition to courses used to satify 1. above. Under exceptional circumstances, the department head may approve substituting a 300-level course not taken in the senior year and not used to satisfy 1. or PHIL 473: Senior Thesis for this 300-level course in the senior year.

Majors who are pursuing Honors must complete PHIL 493: Honors Thesis. Majors prepare their Honors Theses in the Fall and Winter terms of their senior year, and must present their theses for evaluation in the Winter Term of their senior year.

Politics (2017-2018 catalog)
approved revisions for the Politics major:

"A major in politics leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 37 credits as follows:
1. POL 100, 105, 111; INTR 201, 202
2. Either ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102
3. ...

Poverty and Human Capability Studies (2017-2018 catalog)
revisions for the minor in poverty and human capability studies
3. At least 10 credits (9 credits for those completing POV 103) chosen from among the following: ECON 229, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 251, 280:...; ... POV 102, 241, 243 (PHIL 243), 245 (PHIL 245),295 (LAW 221), 296; PSYC 235: SOAN 186 (ECON 186), 202, 228, 266, 268 (POL 268), 278, 288, 290...;

Public Accounting (2017-2018 catalog)
revise the major in public accounting as follows:
"4. At least six credits chosen from among ACCT 280, 297, 303, 304, 311..."

Psychology (2017-18 catalog)

revise the majors as follows:

A major in psychology leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of 42 credits in psychology as follows:
"4.Two topical seminars selected from PSYC 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 259, 261, 262, 265, 269, and 298
5.One advanced methods course selected from PSYC 353, 354, 355, 359, 362, 365, 395, and 398.

A major in psychology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 52 credits in psychology and cognate fields distributed as follows:

4.Two topical seminars selected from PSYC 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 259, 261, 262, 265, 269, and 298
5.Two advanced methods courses selected from PSYC 353, 354, 355, 359, 362, 365, 369, and 398
6. At least 12 additional credits chosen from among the following, with no more than 6 credits in psychology: courses in BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, MATH, NEUR, PHYS, and PSYC 118, 150, 216, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 259"

Romance Languages (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved revising the requirements for the major in Romance Languages, emphasis in Spanish, as follows:
"3. Five Spanish courses numbered 300 or above, as follows:
...c. One additional course in literature chosen from SPAN 312, 320, 322, 323, 324, 326, 328, 333, 340, 341, 342,343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 350, 352, 354, 393, 397, and 398"

Sociology and Anthropology (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved revision to the major as follows:
Anthropology electives: SOAN 181, 186, 206, 207, 208, 210, 211, 223, 224 (REL 224), 230 (HIST 230), 232, 238 (HIST 238), 240, 243 (ARTH 243), 252, 255, 261, 275, 277, 285 (REL 285), 286, 288, 291, 378, 391

Sociology electives: SOAN 180, 202, 205, 208, 212, 218, 221 (REL 221), 225, 228, 234 (HIST 234), 245 (POL 245), 246 (POL 246), 251 (POL 251), 256 (HIST 256), 265, 266, 267, 268 (POL 268), 270, 272 (POL 272), 276, 278, 280, 281, 289, 290, 367 (HIST 367), 390

Spanish (2017-2018 catalog)
Approved revising the requirements for the major in Spanish, as follows:
"3. five Spanish courses numbered 300 or above, as follows.
...One additional course in literature chosen from SPAN 312, 320, 322, 323, 324, 326, 328, 333, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 347, 348, 350, 352, 354, 393, 397, and 398..."

Strategic Communication (2017-2018 catalog)

A major in strategic communication leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 55 credits, including at least 27 credits in journalism and mass communications and at least 72 credits outside the department.

1. Courses required for the major: INTR 201, 202 (by the end of the sophomore year); JOUR 101, 190, 201, 227, 231, 273, 301, 345
2. Diversity of Experience: Take one course chosen from the following: ECON 231, 232, 233; ENGL 262, 359, 361, 366; HIST 253, 260, 268; JOUR 266, 268; PHIL 235, 238, 242, 243, 244, 254; POV 101; SOAN 228, 268, 275, 280; or, when appropriate, PSYC 296; 
3. Take either: JOUR 202 or BUS 321
4. One course chosen from: JOUR 220, 341, 351, 362, 365, 371, 372
5. One course chosen from: JOUR 325, 332; BUS 370, 371
6. One course chosen from: PSYC 111, 112, 114
7. Two credits of internship from: JOUR 451, 452, 461, 462
8. Completion of a minor other than mass communications or of four additional courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in another discipline.
9. Completion of a portfolio in the senior year for assessment.

Theater (2017-2018 catalog)
revise the major in theater
A major in theater leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 35 credits in theater as
follows:
1. Performance: THTR 109, 121 (FILM 121), 141
2. Technology. One course chosen from THTR 131, 236, 238
3. Literature: Two courses chosen from THTR 210, 211, 215; DANC 240
4. Design: One course chosen from THTR 251, 253, 336
5. Synthesis: One course chosen from THTR 209, 220, 361; DANC 220
6. At least 12 additional credits chosen from among the following, including at least nine credits chosen from theater, dance or film courses:

DANC 120, 202, 215, 220, 225, 230, 233, 240, 250, 292, 330, 340, 390
FILM 109, 195, 196, 233, 236, 250, 255
THTR 100, 131, 202, 203, 204, 209, 210, 211, 215, 220, 236, 238, 239, 241, 242, 245, 251, 253, 290, 336, 337, 338, 341, 361, 397, 423, 453, 493
CLAS 215
ENGL 202, 231, 242, 243, 252, 319, 354
FREN 397 (when topic is appropriate)
GERM 335, 332
GR 301, 303
ITAL 295 (when topic is appropriate)
LIT 225, 235
MUS 210
SPAN 398 (when topic is appropriate)

7 Capstone Experience: THTR 471 (1) or THTR 493-493 (6)

revise the major in theater (2018-2019 catalog)
"A major in theater leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 35 credits in theater as
follows:

...5. Synthesis: One course chosen from THTR 209, 220, 361; DANC 220
6. At least 12 additional credits chosen from among the following, including at least nine credits chosen from theater, dance or film courses:
CLAS 215
DANC 120, 202, 215, 220, 225, 230, 233, 240, 250, 292, 330, 340, 390
ENGL 202, 231, 242, 243, 252, 319, 354
FILM 109, 195, 196, 233, 236, 250, 255
FREN 397 (when topic is appropriate)
GERM 335, 332
GR 301, 303
ITAL 295 (when topic is appropriate)
LIT 225, 235
MUS 210
SPAN 398 (when topic is appropriate)
THTR 100, 131, 132, 202, 203, 204, 209, 210, 211, 215, 220, 236, 238, 239, 241, 242, 245, 251, 253, 290, 336,
337, 338, 341, 361, 397, 423, 453
7. Capstone Experience: THTR 471 (1) or THTR 493-493 (6)"

revise the minor in theater (2017-2018 catalog)
A minor in theater requires at least seven courses. A student may not complete both a major and a minor in theater. In meeting the requirements of this discipline-based minor, a student may not use more than nine credits that are also used to meet the requirements of another major or minor.
1. Performance: THTR 109, 121 (FILM 121), 141
2. Literature: One course chosen from THTR 210, 211, 215
3. Design/Technology: Choose one of the following: THTR 131, 209, 236, 238, 251, 253, 336, 337, 338
4. Electives: Two additional courses chosen from the following, with at least one at the 300 level

THTR 100, 131, 202, 204, 209, 210, 211, 215, 220, 236, 238, 239, 241, 242, 245, 251, 253, 290, 336, 337, 338, 341, 361, 397, 423, 453, 493
DANC 120, 202, 215, 220, 225, 230, 233, 240, 250, 292, 330, 340, 390
FILM 109, 195, 196, 233, 236, 250, 255

minor in Theater (2018-2019 catalog)
revise the minor in theater

"4. Electives: Two additional courses chosen from the following, with at least one at the 300 level
DANC 120, 202, 215, 220, 225, 230, 233, 240, 250, 292, 330, 340, 390
FILM 109, 195, 196, 233, 236, 250, 255
THTR 100, 131, 202, 204, 209, 210, 211, 215, 220, 236, 238, 239, 241, 242, 245, 251, 253, 290, 336, 337, 338, 341, 361, 397, 423, 453, 493"

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (2017-2018 catalog)

Approved revising the minor in women's, gender, and sexuality studies as follows:

"2...a.Social and Natural Sciences: BIOL 255; ECON 246, 251; POL 251 (SOAN 251), 255; PSYC 213, 215, 262, 269; SOAN 251 (POL 251), 261, 275, 280, and WGSS 296; and when appropriate, ECON 295, POL 292, SOAN 291, WGSS 180 (when topic is social or natural sciences)
2...b. Humanities and other disciplines: ... HIST 206, 219, 228,257, 258, 285, 378, 379; LEGL 345: PHIL 235 ...

Policy Changes

Writing Foundation FDR learning outcomes. Approved the revised student-learning outcomes as follows:

  1. Write persuasive essays that contain a clear and debatable thesis, appropriately developed claims, and logical organization of argument.
  2. Analyze supporting evidence fully and convincingly, integrating the writer's ideas with those from appropriate primary or secondary sources.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of audience appropriate documentation conventions and mastery of sentence-level skills, including precision in grammar, mechanics, and style.
  4. Reflect on and apply the stages of the writing process including pre-writing, drafting, reviewing, conferencing, editing, and revising to develop polished final products.

Global Learning (GL) Designation:
Approved the following student-learning outcomes for the proposed Global Learning (GL) course designation, as also approved by the International Education Committee.
"In global learning courses, students will do one or more of the following:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of how global issues, processes, trends, and systems have shaped the subject under study
  • Demonstrate the ability to use globally diverse cultural frames of reference and alternate perspectives to think critically, solve problems, or interpret issues and situations as they relate to the course topic
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how the field of study is viewed and practiced in different cultural contexts
  • Demonstrate improved language competency where global learning is done abroad in a foreign language, not English."

Certificate for International Immersion

Approved the following catalog language with revised standards and procedures for consideration and award of the Certificate of International Immersion honor by the Committee on International Education.
"Certificate of International Immersion Eligibility
Students who show significant commitment to and understanding of global interaction may apply to have their
experiences recognized with a Certificate of International Immersion, noted on the transcript and in the listing of
honors at Commencement. The faculty's International Education Committee awards the certificate after considering a student's overall academic record (minimum 3.000 cumulative grade-point average), a senior essay and presentation. The purpose of this process is to allow you to reflect deeply on the value of your experiences.

In general, students who have invested significant time (more than a 13-week term) in study abroad living with native speakers, taking coursework in the target language and/or volunteering, participating in community service or working in an internship are eligible to submit an application for the Certificate in International Immersion. Those students who have combined experience abroad through more than one of the global learning categories and reach the equivalent of a full-year immersion are also eligible to apply.

Certificate of International Immersion application template
Part I: Provide the following information:

  1. Cumulative Time abroad: Where were you, what did you do and when? This includes study abroad, research, internships, service-learning, etc. undertaken since your first year at W&L. You can separate this into two sections: Academic Travels Overseas and Non-Academic Travels Overseas.
  2. W&L coursework: List all courses taken at W&L (with grades) related to your international experience.
  3. Transferred credits: List all coursework you have transferred to W&L from abroad.

Part II: Write an essay of up to 1000 words showing your:

  • development of appreciation of cultural differences;
  • sustained engagement with people of the host country outside of study or internship activity;
  • use of time abroad to enrich or contribute to the W&L community through engagement with the university's international community, a presentation, or a "capstone" activity upon return to campus.

Students who wish to provide additional evidence of international immersion that does not fall into the above
categories (e.g., an original art work, a photo essay, a digital-humanities presentation) are welcome to include such materials in their presentation to the International Education Committee if they are selected as a finalist for the certificate."

FDR Designations:
Approved as follows a revision to catalog language regarding FDR designations assigned to courses.
Current:
"No single course may satisfy more than one Foundation and Distribution Requirement."
Approved:
"Based on the content and pedagogy of a course, the department recommends to the Undergraduate Faculty which FDR area a course may meet. That designation, once approved by the entire Undergraduate Faculty, appears in the catalog (catalog.wlu.edu) in both the course description and the Degree Requirements listing of FDR areas. In no case may the course simultaneously meet more than one FDR requirement for an individual student or be used to meet a different category."

Perspectives course designation
Approved the Perspectives designation student learning outcomes
"In Perspectives courses, students will do all of the following:

  • demonstrate acquired knowledge of underrepresented and/or non-Western viewpoints or analytical lenses;
  • recognize how identities, such as gender, sex, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, and/or class, may intersect and uniquely influence the issues covered in the course; and
  • gain a critical understanding of the connections between such identities and systemic inequities, locally, regionally, and/or (inter)nationally."

Registration during Study Abroad

Students going on approved study abroad may not register for courses taught at W&L during their time away. As part of the study abroad approval process, they will be registered for two placeholder courses, INTR 998: Approved Study Abroad and INTR 298: Study Abroad Reflections and Assessment.

Summer transcripting
Approved the following: "Summer transcriptiong - only of off-campus C&D-approved summer courses - is permitted, beginning Summer 2017."

Approved the following additional courses for summer transcripting, effective with the 2017-18 catalog.
ACCT 453: Internship
ARTH 453: Internship in Arts Management
ARTS 453: Internship in Studio Art
FREN 451: Internship Abroad
FREN 452: Internship Abroad
FREN 453: Internship Abroad
GERM 451: Internship Abroad
GERM 453: Internship Abroad
GERM 456: Internship Abroad
HIST 453: Internship in History
HIST 456: Internship in History
JOUR 451: News Internship
JOUR 452: News Internship
JOUR 453: News Internship
JOUR 461: Communications Internship
JOUR 462: Communications Internship
JOUR 463: Communications Internship
MUS 451: Internship
MUS 452: Internship
MUS 453: Internship
NEUR 453: Neuroscience Internship
POL 453: Internship
POL 456: Internship
PSYC 453: Internship
SOAN 453: Internship
THTR 453: Internship

Internships
...
There are clearly some instances where a summer experience may qualify for degree credit based on subsequent
work in a fall term. Faculty should be involved in the planning, execution and evaluation of the internship. Summer
transcripting -- only of off-campus C&D-approved summer courses -- is permitted, beginning Summer 2017.
In order for these summer/fall internships to qualify for degree credit, the following standards must be met:

  • The summer/fall internship will be the responsibility of an academic department, listed as a 450-level course (e.g., 451 for one credit, 453 for three credits) in the catalog, and intended primarily for majors.
  • Faculty will determine if the internship merits the opportunity for a follow-up fall term project and degree credit. Credit will be based on the work during an academic term with the summer work as a prerequisite.
  • The student, faculty and sponsor of the internship must agree in writing on the conditions of the summer portion of the internship during the spring term prior to the internship.
  • The student will register for the internship in the fall summer term above and beyond the normal full-time course load. The degree credit awarded and conditions of the fallsummer-term academic work, and any additional work required during subsequent terms at W&L, will be determined by the sponsoring department and faculty member.

W&L Summer Credit
Summer transcripting -- only of off-campus C&D-approved summer courses -- is permitted. Students' eligibility for these summer experiences will be determined by the departments or programs sponsoring the opportunities,  typically to include graded academic activities into the fall term. Students will not be reinstated for merely for summer study at W&L.


Transfer Summer School Credit
Students who have taken attempted academic work at Washington and Lee, and who wish to count toward degree credit summer work taken subsequently at another institution, must meet certain conditions: ...


Pass/Fail Grade
After attaining sophomore standing, a student is permitted each fall or winter term to take each term one elective
course (not a course used for the student's major or minor, or a course used to meet an FDR requirement, or a four-credit spring term course) in which the grade of Pass or Fail is given, to which no grade points are assigned.

Withdrawal Grades
During any term, students may withdraw voluntarily from the University only after receiving the approval of the
appropriate dean. Grades for these students will be assigned according to the following guidelines:

  • No record of the grades shall be made if a student withdraws from the University within two weeks after classes begin in the summer, fall, and winter terms or within one week in the spring term. Withdrew (W) grades are assigned for dropped courses after the second week of classes through midterm during the long terms and , during the second week of classes for spring term, and for any withdrawal after the second week of the summer term. Withdrew Passing (WP) and Withdrew Failing (WF) are assigned by the instructors concerned, regardless of the reason, after midterm.

Grades
Incomplete Grade

A grade of Incomplete signifies that, due to some cause beyond the student's reasonable control (e.g., illness, injury, incapacitation), the work of the course has not been completed or the final examination has been deferred. The decision to grant an Incomplete should be made no sooner than the last three weeks of the term when it is clear the work of the course cannot be completed. When the deficiency is subsequently removed, the grade then attained is substituted for I in the permanent record.

To receive credit for a course in which an I (Incomplete) grade has been received, a student must remove the
deficiency by the due date set by the instructor and no later than the end of the 15th class day (three weeks) into the next fall, winter or spring term, as appropriate, whether or not they are still enrolled at Washington and Lee. If unchanged by the instructor, the I grade becomes an F. For any extension, the student must obtain approval from the responsible faculty member on an Incomplete Grade Extension form and submit the form to the University Registrar's Office before the current deadline. All I grades remaining at the end of the subsequent term will automatically become F grades, whether or not the students are still enrolled.

Students may not register if they have four or more Incompletes on their record. Students may not graduate with an Incomplete remaining on their record, unless there are extraordinary circumstances satisfactory to the Committee on Courses and Degrees.

Work-in-Progress Grade
To receive credit for a course in which a WIP has been received, a student must complete the work of the thesis
during the next two fall, winter, or spring terms, as appropriate. Additional time may be granted by the instructor on written request of the student. If a WIP grade is not so removed, the grade automatically becomes an F. Students may not graduate with a WIP grade remaining on their record, unless there are extraordinary circumstances satisfactory to the Committee on Courses and Degrees.

Changing a Grade
Grades may be changed after the end of a term at the written request of an instructor only if the instructor discovers an error in the original assignment, but in no case may a grade be changed after the end of the 15th class day (three weeks) into the next fall, winter, or spring term, as appropriate, or after graduation without the approval of the Faculty through the Committee on Courses and Degrees.

Requirements for a Degree (2018-2019 catalog)
A student may earn one undergraduate degree from Washington and Lee, either a Bachelor of Arts or a
Bachelor of Science, qualifies for a degree by completing the following requirements of the faculty:

A candidate for any undergraduate degree after June 1, 2019, must present a minimum of 113 120 credits with
passing grades, including one up to credit for work done in four 100- and 200-level physical education skills courses.

Course Load (2018-2019 catalog)
Each student who has not completed graduation requirements must register as a full-time student for each term
enrolled. A student taking an unauthorized underload may be required to withdraw from the University for the term in
which the underload is being taken, forfeiting all academic credit, tuition and fees for that term. The student may apply
for reinstatement for the next term. For continuing education students, part-time course loads are permitted.

Note: In order to accumulate the total academic credits required for graduation within four years, the student must
register for an average of 30 credits per year, usually 13-15 credits in each long term and 4 credits in spring term, fulltime course load in all terms or bring additional credits from other sources (advanced placement, transfer, overload, etc.).

Fall and Winter Terms
The minimum academic load for each student is 12 credits, though at least 13 credits is advisable. ...

Permission to carry 15 16 to 17 credits of academic work must be secured in advance from the designated associate
academic dean through the online application at go.wlu.edu/overload WebAdvisor process. A course load of greater
than 17 credits requires approval of the Faculty Executive Committee. Permission is not ordinarily granted unless the
student has both a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.000 and, during the last fall or winter term, a
minimum grade-point average of 3.000. For fall term, first-year students may register for up to 14 15 credits in their
first term. In exceptional cases, permission for 15 up to 17 credits may be secured only to accommodate a physical
education skills course or applied or ensemble music or theater credit
. No overload permissions are given for over 15 17 credits to first-term, first-year students. A denied application may be appealed to the Faculty Executive Committee by emailing FEC@wlu.edu. Appeals are granted only in the most exceptional of circumstances.

Change of Course Load for Medical Reasons or Overload Reduction (2018-2019 catalog)
B. For the fall or winter terms, if students are enrolled in courses totaling 15 16 or more credits in the fall or winter
term and if their success is endangered by the extra work, the overload may be reduced or eliminated upon the
recommendation of the adviser and approval of the instructor and the appropriate dean without a recorded grade,
provided the reduction is made by the end of the second week of the term. The course load for spring term may
not exceed five credits nor fall below four credits and no overloads or underloads are permitted.

FDR requirements pertaining to physical education (2018-2019 catalog)
Degree requirements, FDR FP http://catalog.wlu.edu/content.php?catoid=18&navoid=1505#FP

Physical Education (FP)
swimming proficiency 1 credit (4 skills courses)

Washington and Lee University expects students to achieve a level of health and fitness through participation in a
variety of skill- and sports-based courses. In physical education courses, students

• improve physical fitness and dexterity;
• develop skills in various sports and activities; and
• acquire knowledge or skills useful in the pursuit of physical fitness, recreation, and overall health after college.

A student is required to pass a proficiency test in swimming and to complete successfully four terms of physical
education activity classes selected from Physical Education 101 through 215, after completion of which a single credit
and composite grade will be awarded
. Students who have completed a 200-level course (e.g., varsity swimming) may not register for a corresponding 100-level course (e.g., beginning swimming, aerobic swimming). Student-athletesmay use up to two terms of a varsity sport toward this requirement, up to a maximum of three total terms for varsity participation.  (See Physical Education for additional information.)

Physical Education http://catalog.wlu.edu/content.php?catoid=18&navoid=1472

Requirements:
Degree requirements include the successful completion of a swimming proficiency test and four physical education
activity courses, Physical Education (PE) 101 through 215. Students may not repeat a course they have already
passed. Students who have completed a 200-level course (e.g., varsity swimming) may not register for a corresponding 100-level course (e.g., beginning swimming, aerobic swimming). Student-athletes may use up to two terms of a varsity sport toward this requirement, up to a maximum of three total terms for varsity  participation. Allstudents may accumulate a maximum of six credits from 100- and 200-level courses toward degree requirements. Credits taken in excess of these limits will be treated as repeats of the earliest unrepeated credit of this kind.

In addition to the degree requirements, a swimming proficiency test is required. No students are exempt from the
swimming proficiency test unless they receive a medical excuse from the University physician. A student who fails to
pass the proficiency test will be placed in Fundamental Swimming (PE 101). PE 101 will satisfy one of the four activity
courses required for a degree.

First-year students are given the opportunity to elect whether all of the grades for the one credit100- and 200-level
physical education skills courses
which they will receive in physical education will be recorded as a letter grade or as a Pass/Fail grade. This election must be accomplished during the fall term prior to midterm. The decision is binding
and no subsequent change is permitted.

Class Standing (2018-2019 catalog)
Upon matriculation, students are assigned to a class year corresponding to their anticipated graduation date (e.g.,
Class of 2019). Although independent from one another, this class year and student's class standing as defined below
are normally the same, unless there is a change in the anticipated graduation date.

For purposes of registration, selection of courses, and listing in the catalog, the following definitions are given of
undergraduate class standing. As a general guideline, students should have completed at least the number of credits
noted in parentheses. The definitions apply for the purposes specified only, and do not signify full standing or the
completion of University requirements.

1. A student has first year standing until completion of a full year of college study.
2. A student obtains sophomore standing upon completion of a full year of college study (28 30 credits).
3. A student obtains junior standing upon completion of two full years of college study (56 60 credits).
4. A student obtains senior standing upon completion of three full years of college study (84 90 credits or more).

Degree Credit for Off-Campus Study (2018-2019 catalog)
Only work comparable to that at Washington and Lee in level, nature, and field may be accepted for degree credit. Up to two courses (6-8 credits) taken online after matriculation to W&L may be used for degree requirements only with the permission of the department or program head in the appropriate discipline or, if the discipline is not represented at Washington and Lee, from the appropriate Associate Dean of The College. Courses taken at community (or other similar) colleges or programs after original matriculation at Washington and Lee may not be used for degree requirements. In order to receive Washington and Lee credit, all documentation (official transcripts, official score reports, required W&L forms, etc.) must be received by the University Registrar before the end of the first term in which the student is enrolled at W&L.

No more than 56 60 of the 113 120 credits required for the W&L degree may be earned elsewhere or by any other means than through courses offered at W&L or through formal exchanges (e.g., VMI, Mary Baldwin, Spelman). In other words, first-year incoming credits, transfer credits, courses taken abroad, etc., will not count in the 57 60 credits to be taken at W&L.

First-year students may receive a maximum of 28 30 credits from any and all non-W&L sources (e.g., AP, IB, college courses while in high school). Of the 28 30, no more than nine credits can be counted toward the requirements for a particular major with departmental approval; individual departments may set a limit of less than nine credits counted toward the major.

Experiential-Learning Requirement (2018-2019 catalog)
Approved for students graduating after June 1, 2019, a minimum of 4 credits in the areas of "experiential learning," (EXP) for a single course or combination of courses, designated as EXP after review by the Committee on Courses and Degrees. The designated courses will be available beginning with the 2017-18 academic year. Members of the classes of 2018 and 2019 may also earn EXP credits, but they are not required for graduation of students in those classes.

For a course to be considered for EXP, provide a current or recent syllabus, demonstrating emphasis on experiential learning; check at least one student-learning outcome below; and explain clearly and concisely how the course meets
each checked criterion.

In experiential-learning courses, students will do one or more of the following:

• perform as individuals, ensemble, and/or team members in expressive and skillful presentations before audiences, or demonstrate understanding of collaborative performance and production by designing, crafting, managing, publicizing, and/or directing events that have scholarly, artistic, or practical significance.
• conduct research independently or collaboratively, to advance scholarly inquiry, to develop reasoned recommendations for sponsoring organizations or community partners, to extend classroom learning into the field of inquiry, or to support subsequent senior-thesis, capstone , publication, or public presentation.
• explore interests and build skills through work in the world and reflect upon and articulate how the activities expand, redirect, alter, or confirm their intellectual, personal, and/or professional development.
• build cultural competence, perspectives, and understanding through international immersion beyond the classroom, such as homestays.

Overload policy (2018-2019 catalog)
Permission to carry 16 to 17 credits of academic work must be secured in advance from the designated associate academic dean through the online application at go.wlu.edu/overload. A course load of greater than 17 credits requires approval of the Faculty Executive Committee. Permission is not ordinarily granted unless the student has both a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.000 and, during the last fall or winter term, a minimum grade-point average of 3.000. In exceptional cases, permission for up to 17 credits may be secured only to accommodate a physical education skills course, an experiential course, or an applied or ensemble music, dance, or theater credit.

No overload permissions are given for over 16 credits to first-term, first-years.

A denied application may be appealed to the Faculty Executive Committee by emailing FEC@wlu.edu. Appeals are granted only in the most exceptional of circumstances."

W&L Study Abroad Policy (2018-2019 catalog)
Only work comparable to that at Washington and Lee in level, nature, and field may be accepted for degree credit. Courses taken through community colleges or other similar colleges or programs after original matriculation at Washington and Lee may not be used for degree credit. ...

No more than 56 60 of the 113 120 credits required for the W&L degree may be earned elsewhere or by any other means than through courses offered at W&L or through formal exchanges (e.g., VMI, Mary Baldwin, Spelman). In other words, first-year incoming credits, transfer credits, courses taken abroad, etc., will not count in the 57 60 credits to be taken at W&L. ...

Students are reminded that the faculty has limited to 56 60 the total of non-W&L credits which may be used to meet degree requirements. ..."

Miscellaneous Information

Department of German and Russian - as of July 1, 2017 changed to Department of German, Russian, and Arabic.

Definition of the Undergraduate Credit Hour
Washington and Lee University:

UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC TERMS
The undergraduate calendar consists of two 13-week terms (Fall and Winter) and one 4-week term (Spring),
with the final week in Fall and Winter terms reserved for examinations.

DEFINITION OF A CREDIT HOUR
A "credit hour" is defined as the amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:

(a) Fall and Winter Terms:

i.one hour of in-class instructional time per week for 12 weeks and a minimum of two hours per week of out-of-class work for the same period. Week 13 of the term is typically reserved for exams and may include both in- and out-of-class contact time. For the purposes of this section, an "hour" is defined as 60 minutes:

− in-class instructional time = 1 hour x 12 weeks = 12 contact hours (720 contact minutes);
− out-of-class work = at least 2 hours x 12 weeks = 24 contact hours (1440 contact minutes);
− total = 36 contact hours (2160 contact minutes), exclusive of the 13th week exam period;
− courses that are greater than one credit hour are valued in proportion to equivalent in- and out-of-class contact time;
− example: a 3-credit hour course will meet for 3 hours (180 minutes) each week for 12 weeks and includes a minimum of 6 hours per week of out-of-class work for the same period. Week 13 of the term is excluded from the instructional totals and typically includes an exam period.

ii.at least an equivalent amount of work as required in "section (a).i." of this definition for other academic activities as established by the faculty, including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, supervised undergraduate research, and other academic and experiential work leading to the award of credit hours. Total contact time for these courses is at least 36 hours per credit per term and includes any combination of both in- and out-of-class contact time to that end.

(b) Spring Term: the Spring Term is to be educationally intensive, with in- and out-of-class instructional activities intended to engage students fully in a concentrated learning experience that, in its credit hour equivalency, parallels the expectations of the Fall and Winter terms but in a shortened timeframe.

i.Two (2) to 3 hours of in-class instructional time per week for 4 weeks and a minimum of 6.75 - 6 hours per week of out-of-class work for the same period. For the purpose of this section, an hour is defined as 60 minutes.

− in-class instructional time ranges from: 2.25 hours x 4 weeks = 9 contact hours; to, 3 hours x 4 weeks = 12 contact hours for each credit hour;
− out-of-class work ranges from: 6.75 hours x 4 weeks = 27 hours; to, 6 hours x 4 weeks = 24 hours (for each credit hour);
− total = 36 contact hours;
− courses that are greater than one hour are valued in proportion to equivalent in- and out-of-class contact time;
− a range of in- and out-of-class work provides flexibility appropriate to the intensive nature of the Spring Term experience. Total contact time for each Spring Term credit is 36 contact hours regardless of the in- and out-of-class proportions;
− example 1: a 4-credit hour course will meet for 9 hours each week for 4 weeks and includes a minimum of 27 hours of out-of-class work per week for the same period; alternatively, a 4-credit hour course that meets for 12 hours each week for 4 weeks includes a minimum of 24 hours of out-of-class work per week for the same period.
− example 2: a 3-credit hour course will meet for 9 hours each week for 4 weeks and includes a minimum of 18 hours of out-of-class work per week for the same period; alternatively, a 3-credit hour course that meets for 12 hours each week for 4 weeks includes a minimum of 15 hours of out-of-class work per week for the same period.

ii.at least an equivalent amount of work as required in "section (b).i." of this definition for other academic activities as established by the faculty, including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, supervised undergraduate research, and other academic and experiential work leading to the award of credit hours. Total contact time for these courses is at least 36 hours per credit hour per term and includes any combination of both in- and out-of-class contact time to that end.

(c) Alternative delivery - all terms

i.classes that do not have the required face-to-face contact time (for example, hybrid or online courses) meet the credit hour standard if they meet one of the following criteria:
a.the course covers the same material in the same depth as a face-to-face version of the same course;
b.the course has been evaluated by the department and the Courses and Degrees Committee for content and rigor, and the department, the Courses and Degrees Committee, and Faculty have approved the credit to be awarded. Approval must be documented.